The Phoenix is big sound in a little cube

October 12th, 2012 by

The word “Phoenix” can be used to describe many things: a city in Arizona, a sacred fire bird, an online “University” of debated worth and now a little box that can fuel your dance party. The latter is a 3-inch cubed (3.2 x 3.2 x 2.9 to be exact) wireless speaker from Beacon Audio that weighs in at 200 grams, or just over 7 ounces. It runs on a rechargeable lithium-ion battery that juices up in just under three hours via an included USB cord and will run for twice as long as that.

The cube has a driver on the left and right side as well as a passive radiator on the bottom to handle the lower frequencies. For its size, it puts out pretty good sound. You can connect it to your device with an included auxiliary cord that measures about 3-and-a-half feet or by using Bluetooth connectivity. Wireless connection is relatively simple: hold down the Power/Play button for 10 seconds and once the blue ring is flashing, your Bluetooth device should be able to connect. When wirelessly connected, the other two buttons on top double as next track/volume up and previous track/volume down. If you connect using the auxiliary cord they will simply act as volume buttons.

The Bluetooth is solid up to about 30 feet and with minimal distraction, can go a bit further. Even within the 30-foot range you will find some hiccups when the line of sight between the two devices is obstructed. Our advice is to stick within 20 feet for the best connectivity and sound quality. Any farther than that and you’ll be tempted to max out the volume and possibly damage the drivers.

The Phoenix is available in three different colors–red, black and blue–and is a great option for portable audio in a small package. Head on over to Beacon Audio’s website where you can pick one up for $99.95.

Pros: Bluetooth connectivity, simple and modern design

Cons: Slight hiccups with the bluetooth

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About the author:
Damian Quigley is an Irish-born immigrant who traveled to the US with hopes of one day becoming an editor for Freeskier. Having accomplished his dream, he spends his days testing gear and sipping champagne.