Sugarloaf, Maine to open the summit of Burnt Mountain on Tuesday for first time

February 17th, 2014 by

In 2010, Maine’s Sugarloaf Resort expanded its terrain selection to neighboring Burnt Mountain and Brackett Basin, offering a plethora of new glade skiing options. Today, “The Loaf” announced that it would officially open the summit of Burnt Mountain to the public for the first time in resort history, on Tuesday, February 18.

“As far as in-bounds resort skiing goes, it’s truly unique in the East,” said Roddy Ehrlenbach, Sugarloaf Assistant Ski Patrol Director. “It’s very much like a backcountry experience, from the hike out to the terrain you ski down from the summit. It’s a lot of work to get out there, but if you’re prepared for it, it’s well worth the effort.”

To access Burnt Mountain, skiers must hike or skin up from the base of Brackett Basin’s “Golden Road,” and from the summit will have access to the new “Androscoggin” glade, 68-acres of tree skiing covering 1200 vertical feet.

Press Release, Carrabassett Valley, Maine, February 17, 2014:

Sugarloaf will celebrate a new milestone on Tuesday, when it officially opens the summit of Burnt Mountain to skiers and snowboarders for the first time in the resort’s history.

Part of the new “sidecountry” skiing development that has been the signature piece of the resort’s “Sugarloaf 2020″ development plan, the opening of the Burnt Mountain summit is a significant milestone for the East’s largest ski area.

Burnt Mountain offers a backcountry style experience, with the security of inbounds, patrolled terrain. The summit of Burnt Mountain can be reached via a hiking path or a skin track originating at the end of the “Golden Road” in Brackett Basin. Following a hike to the summit, skiers and riders can access the newly cut “Androscoggin” glade, which offers 68 acres of never-before-skied terrain covering 1200 vertical feet.

“As far as in-bounds resort skiing goes, it’s truly unique in the East,” said Roddy Ehrlenbach, Sugarloaf Assistant Ski Patrol Director. “It’s very much like a backcountry experience, from the hike out to the terrain you ski down from the summit. It’s a lot of work to get out there, but if you’re prepared for it, it’s well worth the effort.”

The Burnt Mountain experience should be undertaken by expert skiers and riders only, and familiarity with winter backcountry skiing or hiking is strongly recommended. Skiers embarking on the hike to the summit of Burnt Mountain should be equipped with food and water, appropriate layers, and a should travel with a group of three or more people. The full trip to the summit of Burnt Mountain and back to the resort base area can take anywhere from two to four hours.

Anyone unfamiliar with the Burnt Mountain terrain is encouraged to visit Ski Patrol at the top of the Skyline lift to ask questions.

Now in its fourth year, the Sugarloaf 2020 Ten-Year Road Map outlines the resort’s ten-year vision for development. Since the vision was first unveiled in 2010, the resort has seen numerous upgrades and improvements, including more than 500 acres of new terrain, a new quad chairlift, massive upgrades to its snowmaking system, a new irrigation system for the Sugarloaf Golf Club, new restaurants and food options, and upgraded facilities throughout the resort.

For more information on the Sugarloaf 2020 plan, please visit www.sugarloaf2020.com. For more information on Sugarloaf, please visit www.sugarloaf.com.

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About the author:
Donny O'Neill hails from the mystical, faraway land of New Hartford, CT. When he's not in the mountains searching for Big Foot, he's the Associate Editor here at Freeskier.